Caryn Lazar Amster

CMA Publishing – SSHS Class of “59”

P.O. Box 366C, Medinah, Illinois 60157-0366

Order at www.chicagospiedpiper.com

or by phone - 1-866-50-PIPER (74737)


I am a South Shore 1959 graduate and have a new book - a true Family and true crime story set around my parent's Wee Folks toystore in the 1950's and '60s.
The title is The Pied Piper of South Shore, Toys and Tragedy in Chicago
Would it be possible to list the book under memorabalia on this site?
I know it will be of great interest to the members of this class.
The cover is by artist and Illustrator – Mitch Markovitz – 1968 Bowen Graduate
The foreword is by South Shoreite and Tony and Emmy award winner Mandy Patinkin
It is the winner of the USA Book News “Best of 2004” Award in the True Crime category.
South Shoreites all over the USA can listen in on a recent nostalgic Chicago South Shore interview. Chicago radio and television personality Dean Richards (former South Shore resident), recently interviewed Mitch Markovitz (South Shoreite and book cover artist) and I about South Shore in the ‘50s and ‘60s.


 try this email address as it has 50's music amd action!!!.
<http://goldengirls03.org/remember_1957.htm>

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----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, June 21, 2005 12:29 PM
Subject: (no subject)

Life
 

 
 
THE CLASS REUNION
>
> Every ten years, as summertime nears,
> An announcement arrives in the mail,
> A reunion is planned; it'll be really grand;
> Make plans to attend without fail.
>
[] 
>
> I'll never forget the first time we met;
> We tried so hard to impress.
> We drove fancy cars, smoked big cigars,
> And wore our most elegant dress.
>
[] 
>
> It was quite an affair; the whole class was there.
> It was held at a fancy hotel.
> We wined, and we dined, and we acted refined,
> And everyone thought it was swell.
>
[] 
>
> The men all conversed about who had been first
> To achieve great fortune and fame.
> Meanwhile, their spouses described their fine houses
> And how beautiful their children became.
>
[] 
>
> The homecoming queen, who once had been lean,
> Now weighed in at one-ninety-six.
> The jocks who were there had all lost their hair,
> And the cheerleaders could no longer do kicks.
>
[] 
>
> No one had heard about the class nerd
> Who'd guided a spacecraft to the moon;
> Or poor little Jane, who's always been plain;
> She married a shipping tycoon.
>
[] 
>
> The boy we'd decreed "most apt to succeed"
> Was serving ten years in the pen,
> While the one voted "least" now was a priest;
> Just shows you can be wrong now and then.
>
[] 
>
> They awarded a prize to one of the guys
> Who seemed to have aged the least.
> Another was given to the grad who had driven
> The farthest to attend the feast.
>
[] 
>
> They took a class picture, a curious mixture
> Of beehives, crew cuts and wide ties.
> Tall, short, or skinny, the style was the mini;
> You never saw so many thighs.
>
[] 
>
> At our next get-together, no one cared whether
> They impressed their classmates or not.
> The mood was informal, a whole lot more normal;
> By this time we'd all gone to pot.
>
[] 
>
> It was held out-of-doors, at the lake shores;
> We ate hamburgers, coleslaw, and beans.
> Then most of us lay around in the shade,
> In our comfortable T-shirts and jeans.
>
[] 
>
> By the fortieth year, it was abundantly clear,
> We were definitely over the hill.
> Those who weren't dead had to crawl out of bed,> And be home in time for their pill.
>
[] 
>
> And now I can't wait; they've set the date;
> Our fiftieth is coming, I'm told.
> It should be a ball, they've rented a hall
> At the Shady Rest Home for the old.
>
[] 
>
> Repairs have been made on my hearing aid;
> My pacemaker's been turned up on high.
> My wheelchair is oiled, and my teeth have been boiled;
> And I've bought a new wig and glass eye.
>
[] 
>
> I'm feeling quite hearty, and I'm ready to party
> I'm gonna dance 'til dawn's early light.
> It'll be lots of fun; But I just hope that there's one
> Other person who can make it that night.
>
> Author Unknown
>
[] 

 
 IF THE MUSIC DOESN'T START GO TO THE
E-MAIL ADDRESS BELOW AND ENJOY

ARE YOU LONESOME TONIGHT? (Senior Citizen Version)

 

Are you lonesome tonight?
Does your tummy feel tight?
Did you bring your mylanta and tums?

 Does your memory stray,
To that bright sunny day,
When you had all your teeth and your gums?

 Is your hairline receding?
Your eyes growing dim?
Hysterectomy for her,
And its prostate for him.

 Does your back give you pain?
Do your knees predict rain?
Tell me dear, are you lonesome tonight?

 Is your blood pressure up?
Good cholesterol down?
Are you eating your low fat cuisine?

 All that oat bran and fruit,
Metamucil to boot.
Helps you run like
A well oiled machine.

 If it's football or baseball,
He sure knows the score.
Yes, he knows where it's at
But forgets what it's for.

So your gallbladder's gone,
But your gout lingers on,
Tell me dear, are you lonesome tonight?

 When you're hungry, he's not,
When you're cold, he is hot,
Then you start that old thermostat war.

When you turn out the light,
He goes left and you go right,
Then you get his great symphonic snore.

 He was once so romantic,
So witty and smart;
How did he turn out to be such
A cranky old fart?

 So don't take any bets,

It's as good as it gets,

Tell me dear, are you lonesome tonight?
 
Ladies and gentlemen, Elvis has left the building.
l

1955's Best  MOvie???
1955's Best MOvie???